Easy TMJ Relief Home Tips

Don't you dare....
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emilyjacob
Posts: 114
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:53 am

Easy TMJ Relief Home Tips

Post by emilyjacob » Tue Feb 12, 2019 3:24 am

When used for pain control, morphine is fast Proflexoral and effective. The doctor starts with a small dose and then increases it until the pain is well controlled. There is no top limit to morphine prescribing when it is used for pain relief. Problems arise when morphine is not used for medical reasons and this is where fears of addiction, needing more to obtain the same effect (tolerance) and the slowing of breathing are often based. A recent survey has shown that doctors are sometimes reluctant to prescribe morphine for pain, for a number of reasons.

They are worried about what the patient might think of morphine. They are concerned that patients will feel that they are entering the last stages of their illness and that there is no turning back. They are concerned that it must not be started 'too early'. This might be because of the wrongly based anxiety about addiction and tolerance. Since the Shipman trial, GPs may be even more fearful of raising the morphine question with their patients. Doctors as well as patients need to be reassured on these points. They need to recognise that morphine is a good way of controlling pain. A report submitted to the Government recently has shown that unfounded fears may lead to pain relief such as morphine being used too rarely and in too small doses. The result is that patients suffer pain needlessly.

Pain can be under-treated for a variety of reasons. Patients may feel that they must only take pain relief when the pain is 'bad enough'. In reality there is no need to 'earn' good pain relief. Some patients who are in pain and have painkillers may not take them effectively. In advanced cancer and other chronically painful conditions it is best to take pain relief regularly, to keep pain away, rather than to treat it once it is present. It may take higher doses of morphine to mop up established pain, when smaller amounts taken regularly would enable the patient to remain pain free. Morphine's side effects when it is first used, and the fact that they do not last long, are not always explained properly. As a result, some patients stop taking their morphine when the side effects would not have been a long-term problem.

Morphine is not suitable for all types of pain. Often drugs such as anti-inflammatories (e.g. ibuprofen) or anticonvulsants and anti-depressants are used to control different types of pain (e.g. nerve induced pain). Some people cannot take morphine and can be helped by other types of strong painkillers such as oxycodone, palladone and fentanyl. We must not let the actions of one person deprive us of a well tried, tested and effective pain relieving drug. Pain after surgical operations and pain in advanced cancer are avoidable and morphine is vital in ensuring that more patients are kept out of pain. Let us treat morphine as a valuable friend, not a foe.



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