Black Molds and The Musty Odor

Don't you dare....
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emilyjacob
Posts: 137
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2019 3:53 am

Black Molds and The Musty Odor

Post by emilyjacob » Tue Feb 12, 2019 4:30 am

Now you can see why it is so important to know the Body Dynamix source of the fish in the supplement you are taking. One of my first purchases of fish oil was a “blended fish” with no noticeable improvements in my blood pressure or chronic pain. Well, little did I know then but the price was just so reasonable! If you want your health to improve, and since every medical research study from Harvard to UCLA all say we have to either eat more fish or supplement, make sure it’s a fatty fish from the right source, molecularly distilled, guaranteed free of contaminants or you’re not only wasting your money, your health will not improve.

Well, I can’t pronounce it, but do understand why we need it. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is a long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid in fish that tens of thousands of research studies confirm is essential for a host of things, from cardiovascular health, high blood pressure and cholesterol, painful chronic inflammation, circulatory, and so-on through the list of diet-related diseases. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is another long-chain essential fatty acid in fish that countless research shows is beneficial for Alzheimer patients, all manner of brain deficiencies, children with attention deficit disorder, eye impairments, and more recently, macular degeneration.

It should be no surprise 40% of our trans fat consumption is coming from commercial baked goods which is defined as cakes, cookies, crackers, doughnuts, pies and bread, 8% fried potatoes, 4% shortening and 5% popcorn and chips. The FDA defines trans fats as "From hydrogenated (hardened) oil found in fried foods, commercial baked goods, processed foods, and margarine." We consume an additional 17% from margarine. Add to that, 21% from animal products and it becomes rather clear, we are swimming in seed oils and fats.

Monosaturated fats from avocado, olive, peanut and canola oils and polyunsaturated oils from seafood, safflower, sunflower, corn and soy may help reduce cholesterol but only if you swap those for saturated fats. The distinction is critical - a replacement has to happen to lower cholesterol. Eliminate the saturated fats which the FDA defines as whole milk, butter, cheese, fatty meats, coconut oil, palm oil and cocoa butter, the main dietary cause of high blood cholesterol, substitute monosaturated fats and you might lower your cholesterol.



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